1. Origin: Hong Kong

    Meaning: “Nickname for 7-11 - Since drinking alcohol on the street is legal, when we hit the town for a night out, to cut down on costs we buy drinks at 7-11 and hang out outside. In the bar districts, the 7-11’s are usually packed with people. “Where’d you meet her?” Ans: “Club Seven of Peel St.”.”

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  2. Origin: Boston, Massachusetts

    Meaning: Awesome (wicked - very; or occasionally cool. Used indiscriminately, can modify anything (e.g.: especially “Wicked pissa.” ; also “Wicked good.” “Wicked bad.” “Wicked boring.”, etc.). Almost always used as an adverb, rather than an adjective; some Bostonians feel it is grammatically improper not to put an adjective or verb after “wicked”.

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  3. Origin: Spain

    Meaning: no worries - don’t worry about it, everything is good, or no big deal


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  4. Origin: Northern California/Bay Area (“Norcal”)

    Meaning: extremely, very, really - e.g: That’s hella cool. That final was hella hard, I think I failed it. etc.


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  5. (pronounced dew-liss)

    Origin: West Virginia, United States

    Meaning: “Literally, someone who “does nothing”— the kind of person that does for themselves out of no one’s accord, especially not their own. Things kind of fall in their lap. They’re not necessarily worthless, but they’re not really worth much. It doesn’t really have a negative connotation.

    Used in a sentence: “Billy’s a good guy and all, but he’s pretty doless. Did you know that he got to go on an all expense paid trip to Hawaii last year just because he bumped into Mick Jagger in line at the bar?”

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  6. Origin: Scotland, UK

    Meaning: Cold i.e. “It’s chankin’ today!”`

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  7. Origin: Louisiana, USA

    Meaning: “The green beans aren’t salty - times are tough [no money for salt pork or ham], but we can eat at least. It’s also used to mean “I have no spicy news for you.”

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  8. Origin: Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA (most specifically the University of Michigan campus)

    Meaning: “It means we’re starting things late. I don’t know how this official practice started, but supposedly some classes didn’t really start until 10 minutes after the time listed in the catalog. A 9 am class actually started at 9:10, etc. There may be an official story as to how and when this started but I don’t know it.. Now it can be applied to any class, meeting, or event on campus. People might look at the clock, see that it’s 5 minutes past meeting time but an expected person isn’t there yet, and inevitably someone will say, “oh, maybe he’s on Michigan time” and there will be some smiles and laughs and everyone relaxes. For some events, starting 10 minutes later really is an accepted, normal thing, but “We’re on Michigan time” is also sometimes trotted out as an excuse (or forgiveness) for being late.”

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  9. Origin: Zacatlán de las Manzanas, Puebla, Mexico

    Meaning: “Zacatlán is famously full of devout Catholics (Fray Juan de Torquemada had a convent there) and people who like to gossip.”

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  10. Origin: German part of Switzerland

    Meaning: “It means something like: it’s useless, it’s unusable, it’s for nothing”

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